There is a Light that Never Goes Out
شیر خانه روباه بیرون : نادیا دراز
20 in NY
There is a Light that Never Goes Out
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newyorker:

Shouts & Murmurs: Who’s Up for Chipotle? http://nyr.kr/13w3fNV

“And you went to U.C.L.A. and spent your junior year in Oaxaca, and once you’ve tasted the real thing, you can’t just eat at Chipotle.Besides, burritos aren’t even really Mexican, and don’t get you started on burrito bowls.
Two bucks extra for guacamole? You could have spent your winter cultivating avocados in central Mexico and then sent them on for U.S.D.A. certification in Michoacán yourself for that price.”

Photograph by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg/Getty.

This is all true, but CHIPOTLE still holds a special place in my stomach.
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futurejournalismproject:

The Pace of Modern Life
From the more things change department, via xkcd
futurejournalismproject:

The Pace of Modern Life
From the more things change department, via xkcd
futurejournalismproject:

The Pace of Modern Life
From the more things change department, via xkcd
futurejournalismproject:

The Pace of Modern Life
From the more things change department, via xkcd
futurejournalismproject:

The Pace of Modern Life
From the more things change department, via xkcd
futurejournalismproject:

The Pace of Modern Life
From the more things change department, via xkcd
futurejournalismproject:

The Pace of Modern Life
From the more things change department, via xkcd
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pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 11, 1804: Aaron Burr kills Alexander Hamilton
On this day in 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr killed long-time political rival and former Secretary of Treasury, Alexander Hamilton in a duel. After years of quarreling, the men met on dueling grounds in Weehawken, New Jersey. Both men fired one shot from a .56 caliber pistol. After the shot, Burr was unharmed while Alexander Hamilton was mortally wounded, a died a day later. Aaron Burr would be charged with murder in both New York and New Jersey.
Visit American Experience’s timeline of the events leading to the duel.
Image: Photographic reproduction of painting by J. Mund of the Hamilton-Burr duel (Wikimedia Commons).

This comes up in conversation a lot more than you think it would.
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"Freelancers are second-class journalists—even if there are only freelancers here, in Syria, because this is a dirty war, a war of the last century; it’s trench warfare between rebels and loyalists who are so close that they scream at each other while they shoot each other. The first time on the frontline, you can’t believe it, with these bayonets you have seen only in history books. Today’s wars are drone wars, but here they fight meter by meter, street by street, and it’s fucking scary. Yet the editors back in Italy treat you like a kid; you get a front-page photo, and they say you were just lucky, in the right place at the right time. You get an exclusive story, like the one I wrote last September on Aleppo’s old city, a UNESCO World Heritage site, burning as the rebels and Syrian army battled for control. I was the first foreign reporter to enter, and the editors say: “How can I justify that my staff writer wasn’t able to enter and you were?” I got this email from an editor about that story: “I’ll buy it, but I will publish it under my staff writer’s name.”"

Francesca Borri, Columbia Journalism Review. Woman’s Work.

FJP: A fast-paced, fiercely heartfelt essay on the downsides to freelance work abroad and the madness of war.

(via futurejournalismproject)

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"I suspect the truth is that we are waiting, all of us, against insurmountable odds, for something extraordinary to happen to us."
Khaled Hosseini, “And the Mountains Echoed”
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npr:

nprradiopictures:

Satellites are powerful tools. They beam our TV signals, phone calls and data around the planet. They help us spy, they track storms, they power the GPS signals in our cars and on our phones. But they also send back striking, totally disarming images of planet Earth.
This set of images is all about showing off the “beauty of the Earth,” says Lawrence Friedl, the director of NASA’s Applied Sciences Program and the editor of a project called Earth As Art.“We want people to look at these images and say, ‘How did nature do that?’ “
The project, which NASA has released in iPad and book form, spans the world, from cold peaks to desolate deserts to ocean islands. But these aren’t your typical snapshots.
Earth As Art: ‘How Did Nature Do That?’
Photo Credit: NASA

These pictures are crazy cool. Check ‘em out. -L
npr:

nprradiopictures:

Satellites are powerful tools. They beam our TV signals, phone calls and data around the planet. They help us spy, they track storms, they power the GPS signals in our cars and on our phones. But they also send back striking, totally disarming images of planet Earth.
This set of images is all about showing off the “beauty of the Earth,” says Lawrence Friedl, the director of NASA’s Applied Sciences Program and the editor of a project called Earth As Art.“We want people to look at these images and say, ‘How did nature do that?’ “
The project, which NASA has released in iPad and book form, spans the world, from cold peaks to desolate deserts to ocean islands. But these aren’t your typical snapshots.
Earth As Art: ‘How Did Nature Do That?’
Photo Credit: NASA

These pictures are crazy cool. Check ‘em out. -L
npr:

nprradiopictures:

Satellites are powerful tools. They beam our TV signals, phone calls and data around the planet. They help us spy, they track storms, they power the GPS signals in our cars and on our phones. But they also send back striking, totally disarming images of planet Earth.
This set of images is all about showing off the “beauty of the Earth,” says Lawrence Friedl, the director of NASA’s Applied Sciences Program and the editor of a project called Earth As Art.“We want people to look at these images and say, ‘How did nature do that?’ “
The project, which NASA has released in iPad and book form, spans the world, from cold peaks to desolate deserts to ocean islands. But these aren’t your typical snapshots.
Earth As Art: ‘How Did Nature Do That?’
Photo Credit: NASA

These pictures are crazy cool. Check ‘em out. -L
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"الكلام من الفضة والسكوت من ذهب
Speech is silver, silence is golden."
Arabic Proverb  (via araberber)
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afghanistaninphotos:

Harvesting Saffron Flowers - AFGHANISTAN
Around 2500 farmers, in eight provinces, are working on saffron farms for export mostly to India and some European countries.
afghanistaninphotos:

Harvesting Saffron Flowers - AFGHANISTAN
Around 2500 farmers, in eight provinces, are working on saffron farms for export mostly to India and some European countries.
afghanistaninphotos:

Harvesting Saffron Flowers - AFGHANISTAN
Around 2500 farmers, in eight provinces, are working on saffron farms for export mostly to India and some European countries.
afghanistaninphotos:

Harvesting Saffron Flowers - AFGHANISTAN
Around 2500 farmers, in eight provinces, are working on saffron farms for export mostly to India and some European countries.
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Summer wedding
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newyorker:

A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler. For more cartoons from the issue: http://nyr.kr/106KD9I

Cat ladies unite :P
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visitheworld:

Asfi Mosque at Bara Imambara Complex in Lucknow, India (by KhaLeeL).
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dutagaci:

İzmir, Konak Saat Kulesi
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paxmachina:

Enjoy your weekend.

Bethlehem, Palestine